Overall cancer death rates continue to decline for U.S. men, women and children, according to the latest Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, released today. Overall cancer death rates fell an average 1.5% per year between 2001 and 2017, declining in every racial and ethnic group between 2013 and 2017. Over those four years, death rates declined for 11 of the most common cancers for men and 14 of the most common cancers for women, and an average 1.4% per year for children and 1% per year for adolescents and young adults. Between 2012 and 2016, overall cancer incidence (rates of new cancers) leveled off among men, and increased slightly for women and an average 0.9% per year for adolescents and young adults. According to a companion report, the nation met Healthy People 2020 targets for reducing cancer death rates, although not in all sociodemographic groups. 

Related News Articles

Headline
Today marks the first day of Mental Health Awareness Month, an important topic especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Brent Forester, M.D., chief of the…
Blog
The AHA is committed to ensuring that all people, regardless of background or zip code, have equitable access to quality health care. As the COVID-19 pandemic…
Headline
The first AHA Age-Friendly Health Systems action community concluded this month, with 184 health care teams and 12 allied associations across the U.S.…
Headline
The Government Accountability Office today recommended certain actions to enhance federal efforts to monitor and address antibiotic resistance. Among other…
Headline
A new AHA resource examines the impact of the social determinants of health on patients and communities as they battle the COVID-19 outbreak. The resource…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported a tripling of hepatitis C cases over the past decade, with the highest rate of infections…