TUESDAY, MARCH 19

FOCUS LEVEL

F

Foundational

T

Technical

S

Strategic

 

TOPIC AREAS

2018 PDC Summit Track Icons
7 – 8 a.m. | AIA/AAH Sunrise Forums

Professionals in Healthcare Organizations
Vincent Della Donna, AIA, ACHA, Principal & Healthcare Architect, AIA Academy of Architecture for Health; Patrick Fugeman, AIA, MBA, VP, Design & Construction, Christiana Care Health System

The Professionals in Healthcare Organizations Forum is a platform for the interaction and open discussion between professionals working in healthcare facilities (architects, engineers, biomedical engineers, contractors, facility managers, risk managers etc.) and consultant design professionals. This forum will review with audience participation, some of the administrative and practical issues associated with the delivery and operations of healthcare projects.

  • An environment to network with colleagues sharing common goals
  • The opportunity to discuss through a broad overview the concepts and operations of Project Delivery Methodologies
  • Examine relevant case studies to determine common code characteristics for programming and planning hospitals and health care facilities.
  • Illustrate the tools needed to create code compliant hospitals and health care facilities that meet the business strategy/model for the client.
  • The opportunity to discuss other critical issues effecting the industry.

Codes + Standards Forum: Programming + Planning
Rebecca Lewis, AIA, CID, FACHA, Architect & Interior Designer, Damberg Scott Gerrina Wagner Inc; Scott Miller, NCARB, FACHA, Architect, Wold Architects & Engineers; Frank Pitts, FAIA, FACHA, President & Founding Partner, architecture+; Virginia Pankey, RA, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC, Senior Associate, Senior Medical Planner, HOK

This presentation explores the unique aspects of the Architectural impacts of Behavioral Health on the hospital environment. The design approach and the specific features of Behavioral Health design in Emergency, Patients Units and other areas in the hospital require specific knowledge and their applicability to patient and staff safety. Also, the Codes and Standards for Behavioral Health Design will be reviewed and their impact on the delivery of patient care to this patient type.

  • Discuss the codes & standards for Behavioral Health Design in the hospital environment
  • Explain the issues related to planning for design and planning for Behavioral Health design
  • Examine relevant case studies to determine common code characteristics of Behavioral Health Design
  • Illustrate the tools needed to create a code compliant spaces in Emergency, Patient Unit and other areas in the hospital

8 – 8:15 a.m.

Networking Break


8:15 – 9:15 a.m. | Concurrent Sessions III

HVAC Design Alternatives for Hospital Patient Rooms
Kishor Khankari, ASHRAE Fellow, President, AnSight LLC

   

Hospitals are feeling pressure to improve the patient experience. ASHRAE/ASHE Standard 170 allows various HVAC design alternatives including legacy overhead mixing, displacement ventilation, active chilled beams, and radiant heating and cooling systems. This session compares the performance of each design option and sensible cooling loads for a typical patient room. Insights into the thermal comfort of patients and probable flow of airborne pathogens will be given as well as advice for the selection of appropriate HVAC systems for patient rooms.

  • Explain the importance of airflow distribution in a patient room
  • Explore the impact of HVAC design on thermal comfort of patients
  • Discover how HVAC design affects flow path of airborne pathogens
  • Compare the performance of various HVAC design alternatives for patient rooms

Join the Conversation for Palliative Care Design
Rana Sagha Zadeh, PhD, March, AssocAIA, EDAC, LEEDAP, Assistant Professor & Co-Director Health Design Innovations Lab, Cornell University, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future; Paul Eshelman, BS, MFA, Professor Emeritus, Cornell University, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future; Judy Setla, MD, MPH, FACP, Medical Director, Hospice of Central New York

 

Best practices collected from five years of work studying the influence the built environment on patients, families, and caregivers in palliative care settings. This session showcases the voices and experiences of multidisciplinary providers translated into a set of design recommendations. Attendees will have the opportunity to join the conversation to define design standards for palliative care settings, share experiences and perspectives, and provide feedback on developing future palliative care standards for clinical and residential care facilities.

  • Define the principles of palliative design and its effect on patients, families, and caregivers
  • Describe new language being proposed for the 2022 edition of the FGI Guidelines for settings in which palliative care occurs
  • Identify the merits of establishing minimum requirements and guidance in the FGI Guidelines for settings in which palliative care and hospice services are delivered
  • Apply palliative design principles to current and future projects

FGI’s Beyond Fundamentals: Moving Past the Minimum
Bryan Langlands, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, LEED GA, Principal, NBBJ; Douglas Erickson, FASHE, CHFM, HFDP, CEO, Facility Guidelines Institute

      

Beyond Fundamentals is a must-have resource providing information about the latest design challenges, best practices, research, and applications of technology in health and residential care. Introduced to bridge the gap in the four-year revision cycle of the Guidelines for Design and Construction documents, FGI’s Beyond Fundamentals resource library enables providers to stay current with trends that affect facility planning and design. Special attention will be focused on the creation of a handbook with diagrams of clear floor areas and clearances.

  • Use the Beyond Fundamentals resource library to supplement the requirements of the FGI Guidelines documents in current and new projects
  • Describe how designers can use materials to discuss new ideas with AHJs regarding new trends and spaces
  • List the tools that are currently available in the Beyond Fundamentals library and those in development
  • Explain how the latest information is being used to inform future editions of the Guidelines for Design and Construction

Applying a Human-Centered Lens to Safety in Behavioral Health
Melanie Baumhover, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Principal, BWBR; Carol Olson, Executive Director of Forensic Services, Minnesota Department of Human Services; Joshua Christensen, CHC, Senior Healthcare Project Manager, Adolfson & Petterson Construction

   

This case study of a redesign of a maximum security mental health hospital examines the use of a human-centered perspective to evaluate care delivery and security. The study includes the intake process; how daylighting, noise, and color can create a de-escalated environment; and the use of phasing to allow operations to continue during construction. By envisioning the whole environment to promote therapy and staff empowerment, the hospital has created a safer environment for better care delivery and patient recovery.

  • Describe a human-centered approach to behavioral/mental health environmental assessment
  • Explain the relationship between a therapeutic and safe environment
  • Identify environmental elements that can reduce patient stress and adversarial interactions
  • Illustrate how phasing and coordination can allow a hospital to maintain operations while improving safety and security

Integrating Technology and Innovation into Health Care Design, Construction, and Operational Work Streams
Marin Pastar, Principal, Director of Innovation, BatesForum; Paul Sabal, AIA, ACHA, LEEDAP, Partner, Director of Healthcare, Bates & Associates Architects

   

Tasked by Mercy Health System to reduce the cost of design and construction, shorten the project delivery schedule, and reduce the cost of facility operations, our team turned to technology for intuitive solutions. An advanced operational integrated lifecycle management discovery process identified the current operational workflows and we developed Enhanced Integration, an integrated workflow process. The employees in Mercy’s support departments were able to leverage the model/asset database with an integrated workplace management system to project staggering operational savings.

  • Leverage innovation technology to better connect project delivery teams during the project lifecycle
  • Manage facility data from design and construction through turnover
  • Develop workflows that target reduction of effort duplication and increased benefit to all stakeholders
  • Recognize process efficiencies to become more effective during the lifecycle of a project

Life Safety & Health Care Facility Code 2021 Changes
David Dagenais, BS, CHSP, CHFM Director Plant Operations, Clinical Engineering, Emergency Mgt and Safety; Michael Crowley, PE, FASHE, Vice President, Jensen Hughes

 

This session will feature an open discussion about the proposed changes to NFPA 101: Life Safety Code® and NFPA 99: Health Care Facilities Code for the 2021 edition, two important compliance documents for hospital reimbursement. This session will cover the process by which these documents are updated and provide an opportunity to give valuable feedback to ASHE on the proposed changes that impact the design and operations of health care facilities.

  • Describe the public consensus process and the importance of participation
  • Review the proposed changes and their potential impacts on health care design and operations
  • Discuss potential alternatives to the changes and compliance strategies
  • Review the timelines for potential adoption of these changes

9:15 – 9:30 a.m.

Networking Break


9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

GENERAL SESSION
Compliance with Accreditation – Leading the Way to Zero

Mark G. Pelletier, R.N., M.S., Chief Operating Officer for Accreditation and Certification Operations, The Joint Commission

In addition to complying with the CMS Conditions of Participation, health care facilities may also need to navigate requirements from various accrediting organizations. This session will cover the Joint Commission approach to improving health care for the public by evaluating health care organizations and inspiring them to excel in providing safe and effective care of the highest quality and value.

  • Describe the Joint Commissions purpose and mission
  • Understand the broad focus of the TJC as it relates to patient outcomes
  • Identify the potential paths to help clients achieve zero harm
  • Learn what the future healthcare challenges are that we need to prepare for today

10:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Exhibit Hall, Lunch, Architecture for Health Gallery, ASHE Connect, Solutions Pavilion


1:45 – 2:45 p.m.

GENERAL SESSION
Cybersecurity & Vendor Risk Management

John Riggi, Senior Advisor for Cybersecurity and Risk, American Hospital Association

Expanding the use of technology in health care provides significant benefits – but it also requires an infrastructure that adequately protects our hospital employees, our patients, and their families from cybersecurity threats. Working with hospitals in a cloud environment or internet-enabled devices, for example, can bring risks along with benefits. In this session, John Riggi will discuss the steps that the American Hospital Association is taking to help hospitals ensure reliable and secure access to data. There are many potential entry points for hackers to access health care facilities, and hospitals should prepare for cybersecurity risks as a key component of business continuity frameworks.

  • Understand the cyber threat landscape and how you can protect your company or hospital from cyber adversaries
  • List examples of ways to help your key stakeholders, including clients, patients, and others mitigate cyber risk
  • Review the Top 12 considerations designed to help CEOs and their staff identify the practical steps necessary for defending systems and networks against the most significant cyber threats impacting patient safety and care delivery

2:45 – 3 p.m.

Networking Break


3 – 4 p.m. | Concurrent Sessions IV

Improve Patient Healing with Balanced Indoor-Air Hydration
Stephanie Taylor, MD, M Arch, Physician, CEO, Harvard Medical School, Taylor Healthcare Consulting; Traci Hanegan, PE, FASHRAE, HFDP, LEED AP, Principal, Mechanical Engineering, Coffman Engineers, Inc.

   

New studies show the relationship between indoor air quality and occupant health, not just occupant comfort. Sound evidence calls for new design and maintenance standards for acute medical and surgical care facilities, as well as for residential nursing and assisted living facilities. Come to this presentation to learn how to support occupant health using building design and indoor air management. Become a leader in improving employee productivity and student learning, and in alleviating the burden of acute and chronic diseases.

  • Identify the effect of dry indoor air on the human body, the microbiome of the built environment, and the transmission of disease-causing microbes
  • Review new research supporting the health benefits of balanced indoor-air hydration
  • Explain the value of using human physiological data as a metric for overall building health and operation
  • Participate in ASHE, ASHRAE, and FGI discussions on best-practice indoor humidification minimum and maximum levels for occupied buildings

Slicing and Dicing: Rethinking the Organization and Departmental Configurations of the American Hospital
Jennifer Aliber, FAIA, FACHA, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch; David Meeks, AIA, LEED AP, Associate, Shepley Bulfinch; Wendy Weitzner, FACHE, Partner, The Innova Group

    

United States hospitals are legacy institutions but may no longer reflect safe or financially effective treatment, advances in technology, or a human-centered experience. This presentation includes emerging models of care and promising planning and organizational models that contribute to improved outcomes. What if hospitals were structured on basic categories of care such as urgent/emergent, invasive/procedural, processing and distribution of materials? In redefining departments and eradicating long-standing silos of reporting structures lies the implicit promise of improved care and efficiency.

  • Develop a basis of understanding of the U.S. hospital and why it is the way it is
  • Assess examples of innovative provision of care that challenge the status quo
  • Improve understanding of the regulatory process and what it might take to make change
  • Discover why the U.S. hospital needs to be more flexible in the future

Will Your Hospital Pharmacy Be Compliant?
Megan Holmes, AIA, Senior Principal, Managing Leader, Stantec Architecture and Engineering LLC; Carl Shilling, PE,CEM, Principal / Discipline Leader, Engineering, Stantec Architecture and Engineering LLC; Charles Parker, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Senior Associate, Stantec Architecture and Engineering LLC; Eric Kastango, MBA, RPh, FASHP, Principal/CEO, Clinical IQ, LLC and CriticalPoint, LLC

 

According to the CDC, nearly 8 million U.S. health care workers are potentially exposed to hazardous drugs, resulting in acute and chronic health effects. The US Pharmacopeial Convention released <800> Hazardous Drugs &ndashl Handling in Healthcare Settings. This session will explore USP 797 and USP 800 regulations and their underlying intent, upcoming revisions, implementation schedules, and compliance strategies. We will share where we have maximized investments by forecasting the industry and discuss how to reduce costly construction while supporting continuous operation.

  • Describe the intent of the USP 797 and USP 800, upcoming revisions to those standards, and their implementation schedules
  • Identify operational practices, workflows, and new technologies that support USP 797/800 compliance
  • Explain mechanical systems that facilitate compliance, testing, and maintenance
  • Describe finishes and details that avoid the accumulation of contaminants and support rigorous cleaning regimens

FGI and ACOG: New Ideas in Childbirth Facility Design
Troy Savage, MESc, MDiv, Project Manager, Mazzetti; Walter Vernon, PE, FASHE, Principal, Mazzetti; Virginia Pankey, AIA, EDAC, Leed AP, Senior Medical Planner/Project Manager, HOK; Jennifer Ries, Associate Vice President – Senior Medical Planner, HGA Architects and Engineers; Sheila Ruder, HKS Heather B. Livingston, Managing Editor/Director of Operations, Facility Guidelines Institute

     

This session builds on the Facility Guidelines Institute workshop conducted during the 2016 PDC Summit and the interactive session conducted during the 2017 PDC Summit. In this session, a “Shark Tank” format will engage the audience in understanding, improving on, and voting for the best ideas from those who gathered in small groups to reimagine childbirth facilities. We will also demonstrate how the FGI uses these tools to improve Guidelines development and to test new ideas for childbirth facilities.

  • Identify the basic principles of design thinking and process mapping
  • Review how FGI is evolving and how it is using design thinking and clinical expertise to improve future Guidelines content
  • Gain exposure to new ideas for childbirth facility design
  • Shape a further research agenda for the FGI by helping to pick a best topic

IPD for $10 Million or Less: Small Project Implementation in Health Care
John Zachara, CMAA. LEED AP, Vice President, Integrated Facilities Solution

   

Small projects make up a majority of the project landscape. This presentation focuses on a large health care system and its first integrated project delivery projects and the unique challenges in implementing IPD tools for projects $10M and less including a new ground-up building and an interior hospital renovation. The panel of presenters will share their stories of success and failure in trying to leverage how lean tools on the big jobs can be right-sized for first IPD implementations.

  • Identify risk/reward member financial forecasting and management for small projects
  • Explain target value design on an accelerated time line
  • Describe rapid trade partner integration during a short duration
  • State the owner's involvement and its importance in this project process

ACHA Master Series: Therapeutic Architecture: Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities (part 1)
Mardelle McCuskey Shepley, FAIA, FACHA, LEED AP, EDAC, D.Arch., Associate Director of the Institute for Healthy Futures, Cornell University; John Boerger, BA, B.Arch., Principal, The Design Partnership; Samira Pasha, PhD, AIA, EDAC, LEED BD+C, Architect and Researcher, Cumming Construction Management Group; Frank Pitts, FAIA, FACHA, President & Founding Partner, architecture+; Naomi A. Sachs, PhD, MLA, EDAC, Postdoctoral Associate - Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University; Angela Watson, FAIA, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch

   

Mental and behavioral health facilities are among the last health specializations to be addressed systematically by design and research communities. Recent publications have drawn attention to the issues associated with providing therapeutic and supportive environments. Representatives of health care design firms and academic researchers will introduce trends and findings and then the panel will discuss basic concepts. The presenters will also survey the audience regarding their perceptions of the most critical factors in mental and behavioral health facility design.

  • Discover the most pressing design issues related to mental and behavioral health facilities
  • Encounter the most recent research related to the design of mental and behavioral health facilities
  • Identify potential impacts of the indoor and outdoor physical environment on patient outcomes
  • Discover future trends in psychiatric facilities

4 – 4:10 p.m.

Networking Break


4:15 – 5:15 p.m.

How Large Should the OR Be? A Multi-Disciplinary Systems Approach to Designing Safer ORs
Anjali Joseph, Ph.D., EDAC, Professor, Endowed Chair in Architecture + Health Design, Clemson University; David Allison, FAIA, ACHA, Professor & Director of Graduate Studies in Architecture + Health, Clemson University Architecture & Health; Kevin Taaffe; Ph.D. Harriet and Jerry Dempsey Professor in Industrial Engineering, Clemson University; Amin Khoshkenar, Doctoral student, Clemson University; Herminia Machry, Doctoral candidate, Clemson University

   

ORs continue to get larger, with little data-driven guidance to suggest how the space should support delivery of care. On the other hand, minimum OR size standards appear inadequate for the complexity of modern surgery. A human-centered systems approach proactively analyzes proposed OR designs to understand how key design characteristics affect efficiency and safety-related outcomes. This presentation proposes an innovative approach to comparing design alternatives and builds a simulation model capable of generating traffic scenarios to enable such comparisons.

  • Describe the relationship between key operating room design characteristics and patient safety outcomes
  • Identify safety and efficiency metrics that may be useful in evaluating proposed OR designs
  • Develop methods to systematically evaluate proposed design alternatives
  • Evaluate proposed OR designs using a proactive human-centered simulation approach

Critical Access Hospitals as Innovation Drivers
Virginia Riffle, Chief Operating Officer, Samaritan Health Services; Amy Douma, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Vice President | Design Principal, HGA; Craig Blackhurst, AIA, Senior Project Designer HGA; Kara Freihoefer, PhD, NCIDQ, EDAC, LEED ID+C, Director of Research, HGA

    

Urban health systems are often credited with driving health care innovation, but rural and critical access hospitals can also be fertile ground for new ideas. The fundamental challenges of rural care – staffing and funding shortages and changing community needs – can inspire creative solutions that push the boundaries of traditional thinking and leverage staff and space in new ways. This session showcases several recent operational and planning innovations including universal platforms that were spearheaded by rural providers.

  • Explore emerging operational and planning strategies that challenge traditional patient care boundaries
  • Identify potential cultural and code-related roadblocks in creating interdepartmental care platforms and learn how to navigate them
  • Review processes that engage leadership and front-line staff in innovating traditional care models to design shared, flexible space
  • Cultivate the cultural shifts that promote efficiency, adaptability, and collaboration

Reducing Ligature Risks & Suicides in Hospitals
Ernest Allen, ARM,CSP,CPHRM, CHFM, Account Executive, Doctors Company; Ronald Makovich, AIA, Registerd Architect, Architect, Mackovich & Pusti Architects Inc.

    

Effective designs reduce risk in behavioral health units and designated ED exam rooms for suicidal patients at risk. Makovich has designed dozens of psychiatric units for numerous health systems. His methods include numerous safeguards for patients, staff, and visitors to help reduce ligature risks and injury. Allen, a safety professional, has surveyed hundreds of hospitals to help reduce risk and is experienced in suicide claims. A review of claim details and the cost to the hospital will be included.

  • Identify environmental risks of suicide and safety in hospitals
  • Apply measures to mitigate patient injury and reduce stress for staff or patients and promote staff and patient wellness
  • Evaluate the cost of patient suicides in hospitals
  • Provide references to CMS and Joint Commission for compliance with standards and mitigation

Lean Strategies for Effective Infusion Centers
Nicole Norris, Associate AIA, CLSSBB, Architectural Associate, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting; Roger Wilkerson, National Studio Principal, Healthcare, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting

   

This session will review the implementation of lean Six Sigma strategies into existing comprehensive cancer facilities to better the experience of patients and staff. A case study will be explored of an infusion clinic refocused to systematically improve daily operations to further patient volume without sacrificing patient care or employee satisfaction.

  • Review lean Six Sigma principles
  • Identify the applications of lean Six Sigma to health care
  • Describe focus areas to improve facility performance
  • Clarify the cause of waste to distinguish it from the effects

Using Technology for Project Outcomes and Solutions
Glenn Hammons, LEED AP, Project Executive, Skanska USA; Chris Hoy, Senior Supervisory Construction Administration Manager – UVA FM-HS, University of Virginia; James Woody, AIA, LEED® AP BD+C, Senior Project Architect, Senior Associate, Perkins+Will

    

To increase their Level I trauma center and expand inpatient care, the University of Virginia Health System needed a multi-phased expansion and renovation on their urban campus. With a project of this size, clear communication and collaboration was critical. The University Hospital expansion team sought the latest technology to provide solutions and allow the end users to play a role in the design process. Presenters will examine the collaborative approach through technology, focusing on construction and related design processes.

  • Discover the benefits of each tool and how it can affect a project’s budget and schedule
  • Encounter solutions to help minimize disruptions to hospital operations during construction
  • Identify which factors to consider when making the decision to use technology
  • Identify best practices when using each technology and apply lessons learned

We Have the Power!
Krista McDonald Biason, PE, Senior Electrical Engineer, HGA Architects and Engineers; Chad E. Beebe, AIA, CHFM, CFPS, Deputy Executive Director, American Society for Health Care Engineering

 

We all have the power to make changes to the codes we must follow. Now that CMS has adopted NFPA 99, the health care environment is changing dramatically. NFPA 99 is a risk-based document applied to projects much differently than other codes. Application to health care emergency power systems has been confusing and misapplied for decades. This session will clarify the essential electrical system, streamline the codes, and explain how these systems rely on decisions made throughout the hospital.

  • Clarify the overall differences between the basic emergency power standby systems and health care essential electrical systems and how these systems affect planning design and construction
  • Discuss ASHE’s goal to unify NFPA 110, 101, 70, and 99 and use other codes as references to provide clarity to health care electrical distribution systems
  • Discuss the requirements of an emergency preparedness plan and how it affects the physical environment and design decisions
  • Clarify essential systems requirements

ACHA Master Series: Therapeutic Architecture: Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities (part 2)
Mardelle McCuskey Shepley, FAIA, FACHA, LEED AP, EDAC, D.Arch., Associate Director of the Institute for Healthy Futures, Cornell University; John Boerger, BA, B.Arch., Principal, The Design Partnership; Samira Pasha, PhD, AIA, EDAC, LEED BD+C, Architect and Researcher, Cumming Construction Management Group; Frank Pitts, FAIA, FACHA, President & Founding Partner, architecture+; Naomi A. Sachs, PhD, MLA, EDAC, Postdoctoral Associate - Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University; Angela Watson, FAIA, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch

   

Mental and behavioral health facilities are among the last health specializations to be addressed systematically by design and research communities. Recent publications have drawn attention to the issues associated with providing therapeutic and supportive environments. Representatives of health care design firms and academic researchers will introduce trends and findings and then the panel will discuss basic concepts. The presenters will also survey the audience regarding their perceptions of the most critical factors in mental and behavioral health facility design.

  • Discover the most pressing design issues related to mental and behavioral health facilities
  • Encounter the most recent research related to the design of mental and behavioral health facilities
  • Identify potential impacts of the indoor and outdoor physical environment on patient outcomes
  • Discover future trends in psychiatric facilities